Resources

Workout Nutrition

If you’re planning to do an intense workout, here are some suggestions for meals around your workouts:

Option 1 Option 2 Option 3
Before workout

If you’re able to eat 1-2 hours before the workout:

1 handful of carbs

1 palmful of protein

1 fist of vegetables

1 thumb of fat

If you’re only able to eat breakfast within the hour before a workout:

·         Small amount of protein

·         1 fist of vegetables

·         1-2 cupped handfuls of fruit or cereals

·         1 thumb of fats

·         Low-calorie beverage

No breakfast before workout
Examples 1 slice wholemeal toast with a poached egg, mushrooms, tomatoes and a handful of unsalted nuts Small pot of high protein yogurt mixed with spinach, blueberries and a small banana and a teaspoon of peanut butter NA
After workout Within one hour of your workout

1 handful of carbs

1 palm of protein

1 fist of vegetables

1 thumb of fats

A low calorie liquid

Within two hours of your workout

1 handful of carbs

1 palm of protein

1 fist of vegetables

1 thumb of fats

A low calorie liquid

As soon as possible after the workout

1 handful of carbs

1 palm of protein

1 fist of vegetables

1 thumb of fats

A low calorie liquid

Examples –     High protein yogurt topped with a handful of cereal, nuts and berries

–     Wholemeal bread with chicken, salad, avocado and a glass of low calorie squash

–     Peanut butter on toast with a slice of turkey and an apple and a glass of skimmed milk

If you’re running a long distance or doing another type of endurance event, adding in a small amount of carbohydrate during the event can give you a boost. Something like jelly sweets or a small amount of an isotonic sports drink is good for this.

 

Food Labelling

    • Low-fat – For a product to be labelled low-fat, it must contain 3g of fat or less per 100g.
    • Reduced Fat – This is not the same as low-fat! Reduced fat simply means that the product contains at least 30% less fat than the standard product.
    • Fat-free or zero fat – Less than 0.5g fat per serving
    • Low-sugar – For a product to be labelled low-sugar, it must contain 5g of sugar or less per 100g.
    • Reduced Sugar – at least 25% less sugar than the regular brand.
    • Sugar-free – the product contains less than 0.5g sugars per serving. These products can sometimes contain sweeteners.
    • No added sugar – This does not mean that the product does not contain any sugar; it simply means that no sugar has been added. It may still be high in natural sugars.
    • Low-salt – For a product to be labelled low-salt, it must contain 0.3g of salt or less per 100g.
    • Reduced salt – At least 25% less salt than the regular version.
    • Lite or Light Products – The product contains 30% less of a specific value such as calories or fat, than the regular product.
    • Serving Size – This is not necessarily what you would consider a single serving – it is important to check as you may be consuming a lot more calories than you think!
    • Per 100g or 100ml – All food labels show nutrition labelling in terms of per 100g or 100ml of the product. Many foods will also show how much nutrition is contained within a serving. Be sure to check the serving size!
    • The ingredients list – The ingredients are listed in descending order of quantity. Therefore if the first ingredient on the list is butter – you know the product is going to contain a high amount of saturated fat.
    • Traffic lights – many products will show green, yellow and red boxes on the foods to enable the customer to easily identify whether something is “a healthier choice”, “ok to eat most of the time” or “should be eaten only occasionally”.

For more information on food labelling, head to these websites: